No Monkey Business

It’s another Lighten Up MONDAY! There are two clips in today’s post. The first clip was filmed in about 1990 in front of 11,000 people and the second was filmed about 21 years later and became part of a motion picture titled Fully Alive.

They are both on the same subject but end up going in different directions. I thought you might like to see how the emphasis of a story grows and changes over the years.


This clip was taken from the DVD, Healing the Wounded Heart. For more info or to purchase, click here.

This second clip starts out the same but hang in there – see if you can see the subtle changes and the different direction the clip took at the end.

New Clip


This clip taken from the DVD, Fully Alive. For more info or to purchase, click here.

So which one do you like the best? 

Do you have stories in your family that have grown and changed over the years?

You can leave a comment by clicking here.

These are two of my favorite DVDs and both are available on my website. If you purchase them, please don’t forget to share them with friends.

$50,000,000 or a Chance to Start Over Part 2 – My Choice

shutterstock_325334552Last week’s post $50,000,000 or a Chance to Start Over must have hit a nerve. I had more responses to that post than any in the past year.

I promised to tell you in this week’s follow up post how I would respond if I had the chance to make that choice. Most of you chose the $50,000,000 and for some very honorable reasons.

If you haven’t read last week’s post or the responses, I suggest you go back and check it out. Continue reading to learn which choice I would make.

A Parent’s Confession is Good for More than One Soul

A Parenting Principle that Works in Every Relationship You May Have

shutterstock_148510727Nothing harms relationships more than trying to perpetuate the perception of perfection.

That is my quote. It demonstrates why it’s so healthy— and necessary— for us to maintain a sense of humor about ourselves, and even to laugh at ourselves now and then.

This “perfection” principle is proven in every facet of life. Yet parenthood provides some of the most compelling evidence of it’s truth.

Parents who pretend to be perfect detonate explosions that can alienate, sabotage communication, and inflict casualties of conflict and guilt not only in their children but in themselves.

In the early days of my ministry I conducted seminars on parent-teen relationships across the country.  As a part of the seminars we surveyed several hundred teenagers. One of the questions in the survey was this: “What words do you most want to hear from your parents?” Of course, “I love you” was the overwhelming first choice. It was their second choice that caught me by surprise!